Open Pit Mines as Assets for Ecotourism and Waste to Energy (WTE) Projects

During a recent Q&A with the DENR Secretary and his team on 15 June 2017 at Makati-Shangri-la, Marcventures Mining and Development Corporation (MMDC) President Isidro ‘Butch’ C. Alcantara brought into light the potential of rehabilitated open pit mines to become assets for ecotourism and waste to energy projects.

Alcantara added that since mining companies will eventually have to give up their rights on the open pit mines after rehabilitation, there are currently NO CLEAR RULES & GUIDELINES as to the handover of responsibility on the implementation of future projects once these mines have finished operations.

The Environmental Management Bureau (EMB) said it is working in close coordination with the Mines & Geosciences Bureau (MGB) and is reviewing these open pit mines to become sanitary landfills after mine rehabilitation.

However, Alcantara was quick to add that “… it’s not just landfill. Some of them are really good prospects for ecotourism and waste to energy (projects)”.

For the full story, refer to the video clip below:

WATCH: DENR Sec. Gen. Roy Cimatu addresses foreign business leaders

IN FOCUS: General Roy Cimatu, DENR Secretary
15 June 2017, Makati Shangri-la

TALKING POINTS:
1. Joint Crediting Mechanism (JCM) between Japan & the Philippines
2. Environmental Clearances for Investors
3. Waste to Energy Projects through the aid of foreign countries
4. Water Security through DENR’s National Water Security Roadmap
5. Developments in the Philippine Mining Industry and the new fiscal regime

 

JOINT FOREIGN CHAMBER MEETING:
European Chamber of Commerce (ECCP)
Australian-New Zealand Chamber of Commerce (ANZCHAM)
American Chamber of Commerce (AMCHAM)
Canadian Chamber of Commerce (CANCHAM)

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All rights reserved © Maria Paula Tolentino

PH Senator pushes for Energy R&D

senate-bill-1290-win-gatchalian

In a bid to bring the Philippine energy sector up to speed with innovative international technologies and make the industry more responsive to the demands of consumers and sector players, Senator Win Gatchalian has filed Senate Bill No. 1290, which proposes the establishment of a Philippine Energy Research and Policy Development Institute (PERPDI) in the School of Economics of the University of the Philippines in Diliman.

“The energy sector is naturally characterized by rapidly changing technologies. Unfortunately, most of the country’s policy instruments cannot keep up due to limitations in local research and technical capacity. This bill seeks to address these limitations by establishing an institution which will bridge research and policy gaps in pursuit of Philippine energy security, affordability, and sustainability,” said Gatchalian, the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy.

In executing its mandate, the PERPDI will also be charged with ensuring that the results of energy research and policy development activities are utilized to improve the energy sector, the economy, and the lives of the people.”

Through the PERPDI, Gatchalian said the government will be armed with the capacity to formulate multidisciplinary research-based policies and strategies for the cost-effective use of energy resources towards environmentally-sound energy development.

“Formulating and executing a concrete blueprint for the future of the energy sector is critical to fostering inclusive long-term growth and development for our country. The creation of PERPDI will be an important milestone in our quest to achieve these ambitious socio-economic goals,” said Gatchalian.

For the complete press release, refer to this link: PH Senator pushes for Energy R&D

Underutilized natural resource in the Philippines could answer energy deficit

The Philippines is the largest consumer of electricity yet is a huge geothermal source which could answer and provide for its own energy needs. Worldwide, the Philippines ranks second to the United States in producing geothermal energy, with Mexico coming as third.  

Leyte is one of the islands in the Philippines where the first geothermal power plant started its operations on July 1977. Other geothermal areas located in the Philippines include Bacon-Manito (BacMan), Makiling-Banahaw (MakBan), Mindanao, Palinpinon, Tiwi and Tongonan.

geothermal-energy-in-philippines_mpat_02012017

Philippine Energy 2017: An Overview

The Philippines has a population of 102 million in 81 provinces. By 2030, the population is expected to reach 110 million.

The country’s only source of natural gas, the Malampaya gas field, is expected to be depleted by 2022, reducing the capacity of the Luzon grid by 30%. Despite the country’s dependence on coal, the cheapest source of energy, the Philippines has the highest electricity cost in the region.

The country will require an investment of $30-billion worth of power projects in the next 15 years to meet the growing demand for electricity.  There will be an additional 51 power plants by 2020 [14 coal-fired power, 32 renewable and 5 oil/natural gas-fired] with a combined total capacity of 4,880MW. These power plants will require more importation of coal, natural gas with the government having to push for a higher share of renewable energy projects in the country.  

The target is to achieve a 60 per cent self-sufficiency level by 2030 from the current level of 36 per cent.

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Thank you to the following individuals who made this paper possible:
Director Mario Marasigan of the Department of Energy, Renewable Energy Bureau
Ms. Tata Corpuz of the Australian Trade Commission (AusTrade Manila), Mining, Oil & Gas  Business Development Manager