Snapshots of OceanaGold’s Didipio Progress

Didipio Progress: A Mine Site Coverage

These are just a compilation of some photos taken during the mine site coverage of OceanaGold Philippines, Inc. at Brgy. Didipio, Nueva Vizcaya from 26 – 30 June 2017. More of this story will be discussed further by Paula Tolentino.

 

Didipio Progress: A glimpse of the Open Pit Mine at Brgy. Didipio Nueva Vizcaya

This video was shot right smack on the mouth of the open pit mine at Brgy. Didipio, the OceanaGold Mining Project. The scale and magnitude of what the human mind can achieve is awe-inspiring.

#ResponsibleMining #PhilippineMining #Mining

SPOOF: How to epicly fail in wearing your PPEs

During an underground mine tour, our group was required to wear PPEs (Personal Protective Equipment). I had to finally ask help with wearing mine. This epic fail from my end was embarrassing and hilarious 🙂

 

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All content © Maria Paula Tolentino

50 years in the drilling business – QED’s Blackley opens up

Professional Driller Alan Blackley of Quest Exploration Drilling (QED) celebrates more than 50 years in the mining business. He shares his professional insights and life lessons with fellow industry practitioners at the Philippine Mining Luncheon over at the Manila Polo Club.

Get a glimpse of his talk in this video clip –

For his full interview about the Philippine Mining Industry, grab a copy of The Philippine Resources Journal (Issue 2 2017) by Maria Paula Tolentino. Make sure to send her a tweet @misstolentino22

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The Historical Significance Behind South Africa’s Freedom Day

For South Africa, the road to democracy was a long and difficult one.

History states that South Africa’s freedom was hard earned, yet despite years of conflict, racial discrimination, and even bloodshed, South Africa continues to rise above its challenges.

April 27 also commemorates the first post-apartheid elections held in 1994. This was the first historical democratic elections where the first non-racial national elections was held. On this day, we not only remember the bitter history and wrongs of the past, but to celebrate just how far the country has come as a nation in building bridges to a better future.

Now, the country is on its 23rd year of commemorating its Freedom. Though South Africa is still in the process of achieving the truest essence of freedom, the need to acknowledge the good achieved keeps South Africa motivated and moving forward.

Last night, I was privileged to join the South African Embassy in celebrating the country’s 23rd Freedom Day Celebration.

To never forget one’s history, to fight injustice in all its forms and to see how far one has come – may it be for a person, community, or a country – is what makes freedom all the more significant and integral for humanity to thrive.

Thank you to the South African Ambassador to the Philippines, H.E. Martin Slabber for having me. I am one with South Africa in commemorating this milestone in your country’s rich history. Happy Freedom day my dear friends!

SA Freedom Day Celebration

Davao Bombing: The First of Many

We have forgotten: there are no winners in war.

The recent bombing in Davao city is a direct attack on the Duterte Administration with the Filipino people as its biggest casualties.

The campaign to cleanse the Philippine system of drugs, oligarchy, and terrorism may be what this country needs but such an approach comes with a price. More often than not, it comes in the form of disunity and the loss of human life.

This attack is a hard slap on the face of Duterte who, prior to winning the 2016 Presidential elections, superbly championed Davao as his showcase city for good governance. What once was an inviolable and safe city is now marred with death and fear. It is no longer the Davao it once was (and it may never be again). This a direct assault on the President’s reliability and credibility as the tough-talking mayor who once made Davao the envy of the whole archipelago.

With the President’s hard lining fight against drugs and name-shame campaign, the violent groups responsible for this bombing are only getting started. They will not stop unless the President gives in (which out of pride, ego or plain narcissism, may never happen). But we forget that in the middle of this war, the biggest losers and the biggest casualties are the Filipinos.

This country is now living in very dangerous times. And we still choose not to see and hear the repercussions of his bull-headed decisions. The 16M Filipinos has chosen a leader, who himself, espouses violence so why should anyone be spared from the barrel of the gun?

The country will continue to live in fear, trepidation and insecurity as long as we have a President who refuses to acknowledge the error of his judgments.

It has now come to a point wherein Rodrigo Duterte is not only a danger to himself but also to his fellow Filipinos.

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Being the first Mindanawon President to sit in Malacañang, it is not surprising if the lenses of our nation are now refocused on the most culturally diverse island of the Philippines. A ‘land of promise’, this potential cannot be realized until the peace and security issues are addressed.

Security researcher specializing in the Middle East, Gregory Wyatt says that if the peace process is stalled, there will be continued radicalization with a huge potential for sectarian violence targeting innocent civilians either as a tactic borrowed from ISIS or violence against Muslims justified with the specter of ISIS.

For the full story, turn to page 28-30 Issue 3 of the Philippine Resources Journal.

 

Mining Pro Murdered: Social Media’s Role

With what happened to the recent murder of a colleague in the industry, this story in particular, hit too close to home. Similar to those who are actively engaged in social media, I am tempted to share such news on my various social media accounts. However, there were a couple of things that stopped me.

Ethics. Sensitivity. Respect.

I am deeply saddened by his death, and condemn the murderers who are responsible. However, if I share such sentiments, what good will it bring? Will it bring back his life? Will it give the man and his family peace?

Ethics.

As a media professional, news like this are DELICIOUS. And as human beings, we are wired to share, share, share. If you’ve had the privilege to work with, or were close to the victim, more so the appeal of sharing it on your Facebook walls. It takes a lot of self control, discretion and strength to NOT SHARE. It may get attention, but give it a few months, his case will be shelved.

The question to ask oneself: What is your purpose of sharing such information? What good will sharing such an information bring your audience/readers? It all boils down to intent.

Sensitivity.

The horrors of terrorism which include rape, extortion and murder are far, far too real, especially in this industry we all call home. Such horrors shouldn’t be taken lightly, nor carelessly shared on social media. By sharing news of his beheading and posting pictures of such a violent crime, will only encourage more acts of terrorism. You may actually be making another insurgent/terrorist happy by sharing his “masterpiece”. Balance the public’s need for information against potential harm.

Respect.

Realize that private people have a greater right to control information about themselves than public figures. Weigh the consequences of publishing or broadcasting personal information. The man murdered was a private individual. He no longer has the power to say no. Respect that.

With his decapitation, the images are next to useless, creating a culture of indifference. The “viral” sharing risks a sense of emptiness, creating a “numbing” effect, to shock without informing, to feed a form of slacktivism (a kind of “armchair” activism, which does not require great effort or commitment and involvement).

“I published a post, shared a photo, etc. I am at peace with my conscience, I received my amount of likes, and now we can go on with the photos of the vacation or the comments on the football match.” It is good to know that in a context such as this someone has decided to become the custodian of the awakening of consciences (again, this is the most popular explanation among those who choose to share). Or is it subtly to glorify oneself?

But the question to be asked here: will there be any concrete positive effects?

One thing is certain: if one really needs a gallery of dead bodies to become aware of the human suffering that exists around us, then we have a big problem. It can be risky in the long run to convince ourselves of the need to use death for a purpose (no matter if it sensitizes, informs, sells, etc.). There is a risk of addiction. Think of the hundreds of newspapers with photos of decapitated people? It’s entertainment.

We cannot ignore the banality of the horror included in the “save image” and “share” command. Don’t you think we’ve had enough of the panic, fear and intimidation these terrorists have sown in our senses? The buck should stop with us. Avoid pandering to lurid curiosity, even if others do.

I long for common decency, respect and humanity. Rest in peace John. May you be the last in this industry.

For more information about this post, please see my references:
Journalist’s Code of Ethics
Ethics of Sharing in Social Media 
Social Media Curbs or Promotes Terrorism and Violence 
To share or not to share