Category Archives: Purpose

Supporting our PH Front liners

From April 1 onwards, I will be using this space as a way to support my fellow Filipinos especially our health workers in their battle to contain the COVID-19 Virus. Some of the charities I personally support are the following :

KAYA NATIN! Movement for Good Governance and Ethical Leadership – bit.ly/forCOVID19frontliners

Philippine General Hospital –
What: Surgical masks, N95 masks, gloves, surgical gowns (alternative: Daiso raincoat), 60 to 80% Ethyl alcohol, hand sanitizers, goggles or face shields, surgical caps and shoe covers
How: Direct your donations to Dr. Mia Tabuñar, coordinator for resource generation. Trunk line (02) 8554 8400 Local 2004, cell contact (0919) 350 6917

Mental Health PH
What: Mental Health PH is providing Hugot Packs to healthcare workers. Each pack contains vitamins, coffee, power bars, energy drink, trail mix for snacks, hand sanitizer, personal hand soap, tissue, ecobags, small notes of appreciation and support.
How: Those who wish to participate in the call may send cash donations through its Go Fund Me account: https://gogetfunding.com/help4health/. Those who will provide in kind donations and letters of support may contact Dr. Denese De Guzman at +63-917-5191406 or via email at help4health@gmail.com.

As human beings, no matter where you are in the world, we are all inter-connected. Currently, there are so many Filipinos (even the world over) that are going through some very difficult times. Basic needs are not completely met, with ongoing threats of depression and a deadly virus that does not discriminate.

As of today April 1, PH Covid cases have jumped from 538 to 2,084 overnight.

Please reach out to the charities mentioned above. They can help protect the health and sanity of our medical workers who are now our front liners to help contain this disease.

I appreciate you took the time to read through. Be safe, stay healthy and follow the protocols given by your LGUs.

Paula

Taylor, you’re not alone.

You know why the disgust is on a whole new level?

It’s close to pimping.

Taylor Swift’s masters are her whole career. Her ‘body’ of work.

Then there are these types of men.

They make money from it.

They pimp it.

They try to control you, by controlling ‘it’.

— All without having to do the ‘work’ themselves.

The industry varies, but these ‘types’ do exist.

Toxic masculinity exists and yes, it transcends the workplace.

As a creative and as a woman, I’ve had my share of encountering men such as these. Disgusted, yes. But no longer surprised.

Yet thankfully, not all men are like the ones we’ve met in our careers and in our personal lives. In fact, it was best that you met them early on. Hopefully, you’ll know the signs even before you make that professional or romantic commitment.

Just letting you know: I’ve been there, I hear you and I stand with you. #IstandwithTaylorSwift

Snapshots of OceanaGold’s Didipio Progress

Didipio Progress: A Mine Site Coverage

These are just a compilation of some photos taken during the mine site coverage of OceanaGold Philippines, Inc. at Brgy. Didipio, Nueva Vizcaya from 26 – 30 June 2017. More of this story will be discussed further by Paula Tolentino.

 

Didipio Progress: A glimpse of the Open Pit Mine at Brgy. Didipio Nueva Vizcaya

This video was shot right smack on the mouth of the open pit mine at Brgy. Didipio, the OceanaGold Mining Project. The scale and magnitude of what the human mind can achieve is awe-inspiring.

#ResponsibleMining #PhilippineMining #Mining

SPOOF: How to epicly fail in wearing your PPEs

During an underground mine tour, our group was required to wear PPEs (Personal Protective Equipment). I had to finally ask help with wearing mine. This epic fail from my end was embarrassing and hilarious 🙂

 

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All content © Maria Paula Tolentino

The Historical Significance Behind South Africa’s Freedom Day

For South Africa, the road to democracy was a long and difficult one.

History states that South Africa’s freedom was hard earned, yet despite years of conflict, racial discrimination, and even bloodshed, South Africa continues to rise above its challenges.

April 27 also commemorates the first post-apartheid elections held in 1994. This was the first historical democratic elections where the first non-racial national elections was held. On this day, we not only remember the bitter history and wrongs of the past, but to celebrate just how far the country has come as a nation in building bridges to a better future.

Now, the country is on its 23rd year of commemorating its Freedom. Though South Africa is still in the process of achieving the truest essence of freedom, the need to acknowledge the good achieved keeps South Africa motivated and moving forward.

Last night, I was privileged to join the South African Embassy in celebrating the country’s 23rd Freedom Day Celebration.

To never forget one’s history, to fight injustice in all its forms and to see how far one has come – may it be for a person, community, or a country – is what makes freedom all the more significant and integral for humanity to thrive.

Thank you to the South African Ambassador to the Philippines, H.E. Martin Slabber for having me. I am one with South Africa in commemorating this milestone in your country’s rich history. Happy Freedom day my dear friends!

SA Freedom Day Celebration

Mining Pro Murdered: Social Media’s Role

With what happened to the recent murder of a colleague in the industry, this story in particular, hit too close to home. Similar to those who are actively engaged in social media, I am tempted to share such news on my various social media accounts. However, there were a couple of things that stopped me.

Ethics. Sensitivity. Respect.

I am deeply saddened by his death, and condemn the murderers who are responsible. However, if I share such sentiments, what good will it bring? Will it bring back his life? Will it give the man and his family peace?

Ethics.

As a media professional, news like this are DELICIOUS. And as human beings, we are wired to share, share, share. If you’ve had the privilege to work with, or were close to the victim, more so the appeal of sharing it on your Facebook walls. It takes a lot of self control, discretion and strength to NOT SHARE. It may get attention, but give it a few months, his case will be shelved.

The question to ask oneself: What is your purpose of sharing such information? What good will sharing such an information bring your audience/readers? It all boils down to intent.

Sensitivity.

The horrors of terrorism which include rape, extortion and murder are far, far too real, especially in this industry we all call home. Such horrors shouldn’t be taken lightly, nor carelessly shared on social media. By sharing news of his beheading and posting pictures of such a violent crime, will only encourage more acts of terrorism. You may actually be making another insurgent/terrorist happy by sharing his “masterpiece”. Balance the public’s need for information against potential harm.

Respect.

Realize that private people have a greater right to control information about themselves than public figures. Weigh the consequences of publishing or broadcasting personal information. The man murdered was a private individual. He no longer has the power to say no. Respect that.

With his decapitation, the images are next to useless, creating a culture of indifference. The “viral” sharing risks a sense of emptiness, creating a “numbing” effect, to shock without informing, to feed a form of slacktivism (a kind of “armchair” activism, which does not require great effort or commitment and involvement).

“I published a post, shared a photo, etc. I am at peace with my conscience, I received my amount of likes, and now we can go on with the photos of the vacation or the comments on the football match.” It is good to know that in a context such as this someone has decided to become the custodian of the awakening of consciences (again, this is the most popular explanation among those who choose to share). Or is it subtly to glorify oneself?

But the question to be asked here: will there be any concrete positive effects?

One thing is certain: if one really needs a gallery of dead bodies to become aware of the human suffering that exists around us, then we have a big problem. It can be risky in the long run to convince ourselves of the need to use death for a purpose (no matter if it sensitizes, informs, sells, etc.). There is a risk of addiction. Think of the hundreds of newspapers with photos of decapitated people? It’s entertainment.

We cannot ignore the banality of the horror included in the “save image” and “share” command. Don’t you think we’ve had enough of the panic, fear and intimidation these terrorists have sown in our senses? The buck should stop with us. Avoid pandering to lurid curiosity, even if others do.

I long for common decency, respect and humanity. Rest in peace John. May you be the last in this industry.

For more information about this post, please see my references:
Journalist’s Code of Ethics
Ethics of Sharing in Social Media 
Social Media Curbs or Promotes Terrorism and Violence 
To share or not to share