Snapshots of OceanaGold’s Didipio Progress

Didipio Progress: A Mine Site Coverage

These are just a compilation of some photos taken during the mine site coverage of OceanaGold Philippines, Inc. at Brgy. Didipio, Nueva Vizcaya from 26 – 30 June 2017. More of this story will be discussed further by Paula Tolentino.

 

Didipio Progress: A glimpse of the Open Pit Mine at Brgy. Didipio Nueva Vizcaya

This video was shot right smack on the mouth of the open pit mine at Brgy. Didipio, the OceanaGold Mining Project. The scale and magnitude of what the human mind can achieve is awe-inspiring.

#ResponsibleMining #PhilippineMining #Mining

SPOOF: How to epicly fail in wearing your PPEs

During an underground mine tour, our group was required to wear PPEs (Personal Protective Equipment). I had to finally ask help with wearing mine. This epic fail from my end was embarrassing and hilarious 🙂

 

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All content © Maria Paula Tolentino

Duterte a NO-SHOW on Davao Mining Conference, MGB Jacinto explains

24 June 2017, Davao City – MGB Concurrent Director Mario Luis Jacinto wears three hats on the anticipated Mining Engineers conference in Davao City – His, DENR Cimatu’s and President Rodrigo Duterte’s.

The Concurrent Director also gives a hint, not only on the content of the DENR secretary’s speech, but what the Duterte administration really thinks of mining.

WATCH THE CLIP HERE:

An Economy Built on Mining – Learning from South Africa

On 11 March 2017, President Rodrigo Duterte says he is willing to let go of the P70-billion earnings the government collects from mining operations. “We can live without it. I would rather follow Gina. Maghanap-buhay na lang tayo ng iba, get the P70 billion somewhere else and preserve the environment. ‘Wag na tayong magbolahan,” he said on Saturday.

P70-billion is no small amount. This is a substantial amount of money which can be used to develop areas and communities that are beyond the reach of the government. A substantial amount of money that can be utilized by the Filipino people whose battle-cry has long been ‘inclusive growth’.

Based on the World Bank for the current 2017 fiscal year, and calculated using the World Bank Atlas method:

Low-income economies are defined as those with a GNI per capita of $1,025 or less.

Lower middle-income economies are those with a GNI per capita between $1,026 and $4,035. Fifty-two (52) countries including the Philippines are in this bracket.

Upper middle-income economies are those with a GNI per capita between $4,036 and $12,475. Fifty-six (56) countries including South Africa are in this bracket.

While High-income economies are those with a GNI per capita of $12,476 or more. Seventy-nine (79) countries such as Australia, Canada, and the United States are included in this list.

How can a country such as the Philippines move from a low-income economy to a high-income one? The best way is to take a long hard look at its neighbors.

Though jumping from a low-income economy to a high-income one may be a tall order, and the Philippines using the mining models of Australia, Canada and the US are too idealistic, it would be to the country’s best interest to redirect its gaze to a country with similar trades, businesses and the challenges that go with it. When it comes to minerals development, South Africa is the country closest to the Philippines.

The billion dollar question (no pun intended) which begs to be answered: Can an economy be built on mining?

South African Ambassador to the Philippines, His Excellency Martin Slabber shares with us his insights on what Africa was, to what it is now because of mining. A privileged discussion, this story was crafted in the hopes of giving the Philippine government a glimpse of “what our economy could be” if ethical and responsible mining practices were done in the Philippines.  

For the full story, refer to page 38 of the Philippine Resources Journal with the subject – An economy that was built on mining: How the Philippines can learn from South Africa by Maria Paula Tolentino

For more information about this story, contact its author:
MissTolentino  
Twitter – @misstolentino22  
Facebook – www.facebook.com/misstolentino22/

PH Senator pushes for Energy R&D

senate-bill-1290-win-gatchalian

In a bid to bring the Philippine energy sector up to speed with innovative international technologies and make the industry more responsive to the demands of consumers and sector players, Senator Win Gatchalian has filed Senate Bill No. 1290, which proposes the establishment of a Philippine Energy Research and Policy Development Institute (PERPDI) in the School of Economics of the University of the Philippines in Diliman.

“The energy sector is naturally characterized by rapidly changing technologies. Unfortunately, most of the country’s policy instruments cannot keep up due to limitations in local research and technical capacity. This bill seeks to address these limitations by establishing an institution which will bridge research and policy gaps in pursuit of Philippine energy security, affordability, and sustainability,” said Gatchalian, the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy.

In executing its mandate, the PERPDI will also be charged with ensuring that the results of energy research and policy development activities are utilized to improve the energy sector, the economy, and the lives of the people.”

Through the PERPDI, Gatchalian said the government will be armed with the capacity to formulate multidisciplinary research-based policies and strategies for the cost-effective use of energy resources towards environmentally-sound energy development.

“Formulating and executing a concrete blueprint for the future of the energy sector is critical to fostering inclusive long-term growth and development for our country. The creation of PERPDI will be an important milestone in our quest to achieve these ambitious socio-economic goals,” said Gatchalian.

For the complete press release, refer to this link: PH Senator pushes for Energy R&D

Underutilized natural resource in the Philippines could answer energy deficit

The Philippines is the largest consumer of electricity yet is a huge geothermal source which could answer and provide for its own energy needs. Worldwide, the Philippines ranks second to the United States in producing geothermal energy, with Mexico coming as third.  

Leyte is one of the islands in the Philippines where the first geothermal power plant started its operations on July 1977. Other geothermal areas located in the Philippines include Bacon-Manito (BacMan), Makiling-Banahaw (MakBan), Mindanao, Palinpinon, Tiwi and Tongonan.

geothermal-energy-in-philippines_mpat_02012017