Duterte a NO-SHOW on Davao Mining Conference, MGB Jacinto explains

24 June 2017, Davao City – MGB Concurrent Director Mario Luis Jacinto wears three hats on the anticipated Mining Engineers conference in Davao City – His, DENR Cimatu’s and President Rodrigo Duterte’s.

The Concurrent Director also gives a hint, not only on the content of the DENR secretary’s speech, but what the Duterte administration really thinks of mining.

WATCH THE CLIP HERE:

Why Margaux (Mocha) Uson has my support

11 May 2017 – Among the many appointees of PRRD, Margaux ‘Mocha’ Uson is one of those controversial people in the Duterte team I would like to see kicked out. For the longest time, I have questioned (and even scorned) her presence in Malacanang.

Now that she is officially part of the team, instead of annoyance, I have become immensely curious as to her background and I am glad I followed that curiosity. There is so much more to this woman than meets the eye.

Uson may not be as eloquent, politically-correct and diplomatic as the rest of us, but similar to PRRD, she is plain spoken and straightforward. Despite the rough edges, I believe there is genuine character within that appalling faux-leather jacket she always wears. (Come on Mocha, it’s the middle of the Philippine summer!)

She maybe a feminist’s worst nightmare (with her connection to the entertainment industry as a sexy dancer while branding herself as a sex therapist to her many (male) online followers), but what is intriguing about her is the unresolved murder of her father, Judge Oscar Uson of Pangasinan.

Like any grieving daughter, Uson wants justice. Justice that has fallen on deaf ears since President Arroyo’s term, right until Rodrigo Duterte came along. In her unsophisticated mind, she believes that a man like Duterte can end criminality in this country. Her faith on such a man is endearing, and her only redeeming quality, despite the sexy image. To a certain degree, she has come to represent the common Filipino who thirsts for justice. It is through her fervor to support Duterte that she may actually give voice to the typical Juan, and eventually, reach a government that has long ignored the plight of the poor.

However, may I caution the lovely lady who holds such a critical role in our government: man is capricious and changeable. No man is perfect and that includes Mr. Duterte (and his cabinet). Supporting a particular person’s cause is completely different from blind worship. Margaux, I hope you find that balance between effective public service and painting a true picture of our current government. Your communications role is pivotal in helping shape a free press this country is staunchly known for.

As far as her salary goes, and I want this made perfectly clear, money shouldn’t even be an issue! In this day and age, why is the woman’s salary even being questioned in the first place? Why is her salary being made public when salaries like Martin Andanar’s isn’t? It’s appalling how the media and netizens would stir so much controversy about her salary yet don’t extend the same treatment to her male colleagues.

Being a taxpayer, I have no qualms of giving Mocha a part of that tax money – on the caveat that she does her job honestly and well. And given that argument, I expect the same kind of work ethic from Andanar, et al., An honest public servant who works hard should fit the salary they receive, regardless of gender.

For the time being, I am reserving my judgements and let Margaux prove herself. The sexy starlet Mocha Uson is gone. I look forward to what Margaux Uson, the woman, has to contribute to our country’s public affairs.

-end-

Davao Bombing: The First of Many

We have forgotten: there are no winners in war.

The recent bombing in Davao city is a direct attack on the Duterte Administration with the Filipino people as its biggest casualties.

The campaign to cleanse the Philippine system of drugs, oligarchy, and terrorism may be what this country needs but such an approach comes with a price. More often than not, it comes in the form of disunity and the loss of human life.

This attack is a hard slap on the face of Duterte who, prior to winning the 2016 Presidential elections, superbly championed Davao as his showcase city for good governance. What once was an inviolable and safe city is now marred with death and fear. It is no longer the Davao it once was (and it may never be again). This a direct assault on the President’s reliability and credibility as the tough-talking mayor who once made Davao the envy of the whole archipelago.

With the President’s hard lining fight against drugs and name-shame campaign, the violent groups responsible for this bombing are only getting started. They will not stop unless the President gives in (which out of pride, ego or plain narcissism, may never happen). But we forget that in the middle of this war, the biggest losers and the biggest casualties are the Filipinos.

This country is now living in very dangerous times. And we still choose not to see and hear the repercussions of his bull-headed decisions. The 16M Filipinos has chosen a leader, who himself, espouses violence so why should anyone be spared from the barrel of the gun?

The country will continue to live in fear, trepidation and insecurity as long as we have a President who refuses to acknowledge the error of his judgments.

It has now come to a point wherein Rodrigo Duterte is not only a danger to himself but also to his fellow Filipinos.

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Being the first Mindanawon President to sit in Malacañang, it is not surprising if the lenses of our nation are now refocused on the most culturally diverse island of the Philippines. A ‘land of promise’, this potential cannot be realized until the peace and security issues are addressed.

Security researcher specializing in the Middle East, Gregory Wyatt says that if the peace process is stalled, there will be continued radicalization with a huge potential for sectarian violence targeting innocent civilians either as a tactic borrowed from ISIS or violence against Muslims justified with the specter of ISIS.

For the full story, turn to page 28-30 Issue 3 of the Philippine Resources Journal.